Children's Books

Count the Seven Fruits of Israel: Before and After

One of our favorite parts of the publishing process is the joy of bringing a client's project to life. When our custom book client, Polly Jordan, came to us with her fun idea for a lift-the-flap children's board book, we were excited to do just that. In order to better explain her vision, Polly showed us her mock-up of Count the Seven Fruits of Israel, which she delicately made by hand out of cut paper. Working with her unique concept and colorful paper-cut illustrations, we were able to make her idea into a reality. Along with the creation of die-cut flaps, the client also desired the addition of a handle that would allow small children to carry the book along more easily. The following before and after images highlight this transformation process. 

Here you can see the mock-up cover on the left beside the final cover on the right. 


One can compare an interior spread from the initial mock-up with the finished product below. We take pride in quality manufacturing and materials, which were especially crucial in the function of the flaps, handles, and rounded corners. 


Here is a more detailed look at a flap, which opens to reveal the inside of the pomegranate.


This is another before-and-after look at a different spread. The integration of the glossary directly onto the background and the addition of a scroll behind the verse added interest to these pages. 

You can purchase Count the Seven Fruits of Israel on our store. Have a book idea you would like to make tangible? Learn more about our work, and we would love to help you create a professional, quality product that stands the test of time.   

Author Turns to Indiegogo: Buy a Book. Save a Cat.

Last August, I had the opportunity to lead a book publishing workshop with Women Writing for a Change. WWf(a)C is a wonderful organization that provides writing workshops, community, and support to women writers. The publishing workshop was a blast, and I met some incredible people along the way--a group of aspiring authors with a variety of projects and ideas. One attendee of this workshop, Kristen Heimerl, has gone above and beyond in her publishing dream. She wrote a book inspired by her three Norwegian forest cats, crafting a fun, crime-fighting story with illustrations by Irene Bofill Garcia. She is using the book to raise money for homeless and in-need cats and has brought together a community of animal lovers and book lovers to back her cause. She is currently running a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo: Buy a Book. Save a Cat.

Check out Kristen's project here and consider contributing to her cause! It's inspiring to see book lovers and aspiring authors like Kristen create fun and passionate communities, and to see books being used creatively as vehicles of story and goodwill.

And watch her video, below, to learn more about the inspiration behind the project!

 

Ring in the New Year With a Writing Resolution: Tell Your Story

At Orange Frazer, we believe that good stories abound. We have worked with grandfathers, CEO’s, surgeons, teachers, chefs, and daughters. We have told sports histories, highlighted success stories, photographed communities, celebrated anniversaries, and commemorated legacies. We know that the inherent value of a story lies in its telling, that with each telling a story gains new life and purpose. We know that the power of a person’s life and passion should be passed on, preserved, and reinvigorated for successive generations. img202

Jane Murray Heimlich

img187

And it is at this time of year that we reflect on these stories—where we’ve been and the books we’ve seen unfold (and sold!)—and when we push ourselves to look forward with confidence and excitement to the stories that will come our way. Each new project is an opportunity to become an expert in a new field or a confidante of a new story. We are the collectors of facts and histories, memories and aged photographs. We have turned shoeboxes of keepsakes into gorgeous coffee-table books, musings into poignant memoirs. We know the art of shaping thoughts into stories and visions into designs, and we look forward to each new opportunity to stretch our creative muscles.

We know what we are doing for our new year, but what are you doing with yours? Do you have dreams of writing a children’s book? Is your business approaching a milestone or anniversary? Do you have collections of photos or a family history that needs preserving? Perhaps it’s time to pursue that inkling of a story that has been sitting in the back of your mind (or perhaps on the tip of your tongue) for years. Make a promise to yourself in this new year to tell your story, because Orange Frazer is listening.

Find out more about how to make your dream of publishing a reality here. Also, be on the lookout for Orange Frazer in your city, as the “Tell Your Story” tour will begin this month in Wilmington, Ohio (and will move to Cincinnati soon!). We will be visiting retirement communities, non-profits, and community centers to talk about writing as storytelling, healing, celebrating, and connecting. We will be documenting the campaign on our blog and on Twitter with the hashtag #tellyourstory.

Harriett's Homecoming Book Signing

This Saturday Orange Frazer had the opportunity to join Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Cincinnati for a truly one-of-a-kind book signing for our author, Susan Levine. Susan read her book, Harriett's Homecoming: A High-Flying Tour of Cincinnati, and a representative from Raptor, Inc. brought a live peregrine falcon. As an adult, I probably learned just as much as all of the kids there (Did you know the peregrine falcon is the fastest animal on earth, clocking in at 200 mph? Now I do!). Here are two of my favorite snapshots from the event (cell phone snapshots, that is--didn't want to startle the falcon!). Harriett's Homecoming book signing with Susan Levine

Author Insider: How to Sell Your Book with Susan Levine

As I’m sure our readers know (because I haven’t been able to stop talking about it for weeks), our newest children’s book, Harriett’s Homecoming: A High-Flying Tour of Cincinnati, comes out next week! The author, Susan Levine, is a marketing powerhouse, and I thought it would be a great resource for our commercial and custom authors alike to hear about her unique promotion tactics. As she will tell you herself, it’s all about personal relationships, so I spent a while on the phone with her this morning gleaning her wisdom. Here is the condensed version:

1. Start with questions: You have to put yourself in the customer’s shoes to understand the audience.  Why do they want my book? How is my book different than any other book they could buy? I knew my audience would be engaged parents and grandparents—people that are taking their kids around the city to see these places. My audience is also librarians and teachers. It is required by state education standards to teach elementary-aged children about Ohio history. This is the perfect book for them—an illustrated children’s picture book about a great Ohio city.

And it’s not just the end consumer—you have to think about the distributors who will move your book along to the customer. Who wants to sell my book? How is this different than any other book they sell? What can I do to get it to them? How can I get them excited about my book? I knew I should approach the highlighted places in the book, and then hone in on specialty book and toy stores. When I was promoting my first book, Packard Takes Flight: A Bird’s Eye View of Columbus, I approached Larson’s Toys and Games in Columbus about carrying it. I stopped in every few weeks, I brought them Graeter’s Ice Cream coupons as a thank-you when they bent over backwards to help me—I built a personal relationship with them. And the result? They have had my book on the counter for over two years now, and they’ve personally sold hundreds of copies.

2. Network: I worked with the places featured in the book for months ahead of time—researching, building relationships, getting permission for inclusion and pictures and history, etc. I will be dropping off a thank-you copy of the book to every single one of these places, asking them to pass it around and tell their friends.

3. Know your seller: Niche markets want something people can’t find many other places. When I am doing a book on a particular city, I will go to every neighborhood in that city and walk through all of the specialty book and gift stores. Once I’ve figured out which one is the best fit for my book, I go in and talk to a manager, explain to them how perfect their store is for my book and pitch it to them to stock it. But, I will only offer it to their store, and I make it clear that they would be the exclusive seller in that neighborhood.  It then becomes mutually beneficial.

And once you have your book stocked somewhere you can’t just stop there. Specialty book and gift shops don’t operate like your franchised Barnes & Noble: they don’t have books on automatic replenishment. You have to go in every six months and check on your book—do they have enough copies, do they need any more signed, is the book displayed well and correctly? This is where an author has a lot of pull in keeping their book stocked and displayed.

4. Be Assertive: You have to be confident, and you have to be proactive. Talk personally with booksellers, know the Kids’ Lead at your local Barnes & Noble, ask them if they need to place a new order, ask them how to get a staff-pick for your book or how to get better bookshelf placement.

5. Social Media is Powerful: I’m still learning how to optimize social media, but I am learning just how effective it can be. When I was doing Packard Takes Flight, a natural resources/falcon conservancy blog posted about the book and linked to my web store. Within days orders were rolling in online—and these were just from peregrine falcon enthusiasts! Never underestimate what online buzz in a niche industry can do for you.

6. Do Complimentary Programs and Speaking Engagements: Our greatest success with both Packard Takes Flight and Harriett’s Homecoming has been our interactive, engaging, and multi-disciplinary school program. I’ve had so many school librarians who’ve told me it’s the best program they’ve ever been a part of. My favorite was an older librarian who told me: “This is the best author visit we’ve ever seen…and I’ve seen a lot.” And it’s effective because it keeps the kids engaged, learning, and moving.  We talk about architecture, about cities, about falcons, about how books are made. They get to meet Erin, the illustrator, and learn about the artwork and they get to meet the falcon and learn about a native species. It’s really fun and fast-paced, and it moves more books than anything else.

Speaking engagements are also important because they help expose you to your niche audiences. They are never a direct sales pitch, but they enable you to talk about what you’re best at, and you can use your experience and your book as an example. I’ve spoken for the Audubon Society, the Ohio Libraries Conference, the Columbus Historical Society—the list goes on.

7. Make sure you are filling an unmet need with your book: Write a book that fills a need that you are uniquely qualified to fill, and then tell people about it. 

A big thank-you to Susan for her insight!